Kernel Crossover – The Aftermath

 

I was greeted by a cheery Windows 7 environment when I opened my computer last night. Windows 7 feels like MacOSX’s half-brother – seems so similar and yet very different. It is sleeker than Vista but not significantly so and the experts out there may say that the engine is far more robust, but as a geek-reprobate, I really can’t feel any difference.

As expected I had to re-install my programs – and I also used this opportunity not to install any of the programs that I didn’t really use in the past. As anticipated as well, I had to re-install the device drivers for my computer – webcam, scanner, TV tuner card, wireless adaptor and printer. After the installation, Windows 7 initially didn’t recognise my wireless adaptor, so I had to download the driver using my MacBook and then using a USB flashdrive, I installed it in my computer. [Lesson #1: If you don’t have multiple computers like I do, ensure that you download the driver for your wireless adaptor or network card, and save it in a USB drive before you do your upgrade]. I was also worried that it would reject my printer as it was purchased almost eight years ago, or my TV tuner card that I have used from my Windows XP days. Thankfully the drivers are available in their respective website. The data transfer using Windows Easy Transfer was also relatively painless – it managed to copy all of the songs, documents and tidbits from my ‘old’ environment. When I reinstalled Firefox, it opened up with the tabs that I opened the last time before the ‘crossover’, giving the impression that everything is going well.

Well, unfortunately, the crossover held some of my data captive.

My emails.

Argh! 😡

While it successfully copied my Firefox profile, it didn’t copy my Thunderbird profile – the program that I use for my emails. I shouldn’t have trusted Windows Easy Transfer when it mentioned in the dialog box that it would also copy my emails. Argh. I don’t know how to dissect the file that Windows Easy Transfer created and see whether I can find my Thunderbird profile. [Lesson #2: Copy and backup your mailbox and profile if you are using Thunderbird, before you install Windows 7]. So at the moment, I’m still too wary in creating a new Thunderbird profile and download all of the outstanding emails in the server, in case I can restore my old profile.

I suppose as I get older, I learn not to hold on to my possessions too tight – if I lose them, well, then so be it, I suppose. :sigh:

Does anybody have any clue on how I can restore my Thunderbird mail profile from the .MIG file that was created by Windows Easy Transfer?


Published by fuzz

I've finally relented to the lures of blogging - and for those who care, well, I'm a self-confessed geek who's a wanderer at heart, who thinks and analyses too much, and who's trying hard to hold on to his 7-year old inner persona.

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3 Comments

  1. Oh that is very painful. I had that a couple of years ago. Backed up everything, and after formatting my hd and reinstallation of XP, found out I forgot to back up my emails! Oh horror. Unfortunately I’m not really sure what I would do in your case. Does Windows Easy Transfer (uhuh) delete all the old stuff? Or is the folder where Thunderbird stores the profile files still there? What doesn’t help you, but what might help others, I always backup all of my documents and program settings (and email 🙂 ) to a second partition on my hard disk, only clean up the first partition (with Windows) and then after the fresh install of Windows on my first partition I still can import everything I need from the second partition.

  2. Andris,

    Thank you for your comments – I’ve certainly learnt it the hard way! Presumably my Documents and Settings stuff are there but they’re stored in a .MIG file that I wouldn’t know how to dissect. I used WET to restore my documents and setting from the file already after I installed Windows 7 but I wouldn’t know how to look into it and be geeky. Ah well!

    “A time to scatter stones and a time to gather stones.” 🙂

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