The things I learn from my dog

 

It’s already past midnight and I’m still awake running a query for a project that I’m helping at work. I can hear Indy softly snoring outside my office as usual. I know that I’ve been writing a lot about Indy more than about myself or about Yani lately — for those of you who have access to my Facebook or my Instagram photos, you would know what I mean. 🙂

I’ve grown very fond of Indy – especially the love and the loyalty that he’s showing me. Every time I’m in my study, he would wait for me to finish tinkering around with my computer or working before he follows me to sleep. It’s true that when you have a “staffy” – the nickname given to Staffordshire Bull Terriers – you are never truly alone. A staffy would follow you wherever you go and would like to know where you are.  Indy is quite used to being left alone when Yani and I are at work – whenever we arrive home, he would go crazy for a while, dashing around the living room and the corridor with one of his half-chewed toys before settling down for a belly rub.

Indy wasn’t an indoor dog when we adopted him – his previous parents had another dog that they kept in the house as she was an older, more docile dog. At that time, Indy wasn’t desexed as well, so he was more excitable and he does have a penchant to “kill” squeaky toys. He wouldn’t stop tearing the toy until the squeaking stops. So if you have two toddlers, that’s a massive no-no. Indy wouldn’t hurt anybody though – he is definitely a big sook. I still remember his big sad eyes when I saw him for the first time in August last year. Those eyes still mesmerise me – sometimes they still look sad and melancholic. Sometimes when he demands to sit facing me on my lap, rather than being rested, he would look me in the eye and I could almost see the loyalty and feelings that he has for me.

Earlier tonight as I sat in the living room with my laptop, Indy followed me and plonked himself in the adjoining couch – wanting to be near me and dying to sleep. He wants to wait for me though. He has proven to be a great indoor dog as well. In his old house, Indy was not allowed to enter the house because of the reason that I stated before – but in our house, Indy is free to roam around the house except for the bathroom and the spare bedroom (in the past, he had the heroic urge to pee on my clean laundry, so his pee smell would mask my smell and ward off “my enemies”). Hehe. It may sound funny, but it is totally annoying when your laundry smells like dog pee!

After having Indy, I start to understand why a dog is called a man’s (or a woman’s) best friend. Such love and loyalty is hard to find in another human being. When you adopt a dog, he or she has full faith that you will take care of him/her. Perhaps I’m projecting human feelings and qualities on animal – but I can’t imagine being taken away from your kind at an early age, and to live with a different family of a different species. Looking at Indy, I see his faith and dependence on me that I would supply his food and drinks and his recreationary needs.

So if you are reading this blog post and still umming and erring about getting a dog, if you are ready for a companion, not a toy or a seasonal gift, go and adopt one. You will not be disappointed. There are a lot of dogs waiting to be loved in your nearest animal shelters and I’m sure you will have similar experiences with your new companion. Please contact your nearest shelter before you visit any pet store and further support puppy farms. Indy is just an ordinary sooky dog – he doesn’t sing whenever he hears a song, his trick repertoire is still very limited and he hasn’t done anything that is outrageously funny or heroic, but he does have a big heart and he loves both Yani and I very deeply.


Published by fuzz

I've finally relented to the lures of blogging - and for those who care, well, I'm a self-confessed geek who's a wanderer at heart, who thinks and analyses too much, and who's trying hard to hold on to his 7-year old inner persona.

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